Author Topic: Chasing the most dominant storm  (Read 2890 times)

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Offline Mike

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Chasing the most dominant storm
« on: 03 August 2007, 02:58:00 PM »
I now that this relates to experience, but for those such as I who want to gain valuable experience i have these questions:

When you have a long line of storms coming in a squall line how is it that some storms will develop stronger if all storms create their own cold pools and have a negative affect on others' development?  Where are those that become stronger drawing their warm air from? - is the furthermost storm in the group that is going to be stronger due to not being in the vicinity of surrounding cold pooling and can advance faster ahead?  What should i be looking for when viewing radar images if no up to date satpics are available?

I don't want to rely on radar images per se to chase, but it's a necessity to use radar in some circumstances.

What I want to do is locate the best storm in a group.  I don't mind doing the miles to intercept it, but I don't want to be chasing rubbish either!

Mike
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14

Offline Jimmy Deguara

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Re: Chasing the most dominant storm
« Reply #1 on: 03 August 2007, 04:49:25 PM »
Mike,

Chasing is as you suggest one of experience. Chasing the dominant storm is one component - recognition is another. Visuals are usually the best one can go by but in the interim, sure use radar to back up your chasing and not waste your time nor fuel.

However, radar in Australia (except in long lived examples - specifically supercells) are close to inefficient to use as a chase now cast tool yourself. There firstly is a lagging effect of between 10 to 20 minutes. In the case of cells that do not last this period of time you will find yourself chasing your own tail. In the tropics, this can be one classic region where this will be the case. And visuals with this lag can make it confusing as to what may be happening versus what has happened - radar versus visual.

The more one can build the visual experience, the less reliant you will have to be on radar. The most successful chasers in Australia I find do not rely on radar. I have written a section on observational aspects of weather in myObservation Weather Techniques and I think it does touch on recognition of severe storm features and behaviour.

As I suggested earlier, it is one thing to recognise or identifying the dominant storm or perhaps pattern of storm behaviour, it is another to be able to chase it. Positioning oneself in relation to a storm in general with safety and confort zone in mind is a skill acquired once again through experience. I bet there are few books or manuals covering detailed chase strategy:)

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
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Offline Mike

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Re: Chasing the most dominant storm
« Reply #2 on: 03 August 2007, 04:52:14 PM »
Thanks so much fellas.  So much information just in those replies. :)

MIke
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14