Author Topic: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007  (Read 6898 times)

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Offline Mike

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TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« on: 13 July 2007, 07:20:40 AM »
Tropical storm Man-Yi has developed into a nice sized typhoon thank you very much!  Yesterday winds were gusting around 70kts, but today she or he is now having sustained gusts of 90kts and gusts to 110kts.  The NOAA photo certainly shows nice structure now that the eyewall has formed.  

Current movement is NW at 18kts and is located 17.4N and 132.9E of Naha, Japan.

Mike
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Offline Mike

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #1 on: 13 July 2007, 01:24:06 PM »
I'll look forward to the pic and any data you find John.  This typhoon certainly an interesting one to keep an eye on.

Mike
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Offline Mike

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #2 on: 14 July 2007, 05:57:35 AM »
John, found these two papers on what you were thinking re warm eddies and weak shear. Good reading from reliable and respected sources.  Worthwhile reading!

www.mmm.ucar.edu/asr96/part_c.html and http://confex.com/ams/12meso/techprogram/paper126209.htm

Mike
Darwin, Northern Territory.
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Offline Mike

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #3 on: 16 July 2007, 05:55:10 AM »
Typhoon Man-Yi now rated super typhoon. Sustained gusts of 155mph with gusts to 184 mph.  Reports have been made of waves up to 42 feet or 15 metres high!  The super typhoon has already smashed through Okinawa and is headed for Kyushu Japan. 

This system certainly has the trademarks of a very nasty storm given the amount of strength it has gained over the last three days.  The storm has a massive spiral band on the latest satpics and is very impressive.

The website, the.honoluluadvertiser.com has some neat photos of the storm surge on the beach etc.

Would it be safe to surmmise that the subtropical ridge and mid-lattitude winds are enhancing Man-Yi's progress and strength ?

Mike
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Offline Mike

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #4 on: 20 July 2007, 06:17:41 AM »
Here's some great satpics of Many-Yi as he/she approached Okinawa.  There's a great site to view in fact global events with Earth Observation or ESA at  http://earth.esa.int/ew/cyclones/Man-Yi_Typhoon-july07/Typhoon_Man-Yi-july07.htm There's also a track map.

(acknowledgement to this organisation for the track maps and photos )

Mike

« Last Edit: 20 July 2007, 03:35:53 PM by Mike »
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Offline Jimmy Deguara

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #5 on: 20 July 2007, 08:26:07 AM »
Mike et al,

What a beautifully structured typhoon - simply incredible spiral bands and eye! Obviously the clean organised structure certainly explains some of the wind speeds being so strong. Question of course: Is Japan often experiencing typhoons? I know places such as Hong Konh and the Phillipines and southern China do but not often have I heard of Japan being in the path. What is the comparitive frequency compared to the other region?

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Jimmy Deguara
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Offline Mike

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RE: TYPHOON MAN-YI: 08 to 15 July 2007
« Reply #6 on: 20 July 2007, 12:35:02 PM »

   I found this quote while searching.  I think it explains what you were asking Jimmy. 

*Excerpt acknowledgment from the article by*    Kouhei Yamada and Ryuichi Kawamura; “Dynamical Link between Typhoon Activity and the PJ Teleconnection Pattern from Early Summer to Autumn as Revealed by the JRA-25 Reanalysis”, SOLA, Vol. 3, pp.65-68 (2007) .

'Using the Japanese long-term Re-Analysis project (JRA-25) data, we investigated the seasonal dependence on dynamical links between the Pacific-Japan (PJ) pattern and typhoon activity. It was found that the PJ patterns tend to prevail soon after typhoons to the east of the Philippines migrating northward across the 20°N line during the period from July to October. Especially in early summer the low-level southwesterly jet formed by the penetration of the Asian summer monsoon westerlies into the Philippine Sea enables the typhoons to generate the PJ pattern, whereas in autumn the upper-level Asian jet contributes to the appearance of PJ as an alternative waveguide. The seasonal differences in latitudinal position and strength between the two different waveguides influence the vertical tilt structure of PJ in the vicinity of Japan. It also turns out that even though the typhoons are far away from Japan, they have the potential to indirectly and remotely activate stationary fronts around Japan during the rainy season through the dominance of PJ.'

Was a very interesting read through the PDF version.

Mike


   
« Last Edit: 20 July 2007, 03:32:47 PM by Mike »
Darwin, Northern Territory.
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