Author Topic: Top End Storm Information - Master's Thesis  (Read 3634 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline David C

  • Global Moderator
  • Barrel tornado F4
  • *
  • Posts: 643
  • Gender: Male
    • Thunderbolt Tours Storm Chasing Adventures
Top End Storm Information - Master's Thesis
« on: 05 January 2007, 12:52:03 PM »
www.geo.uu.se/luva/exarb/2006/Andreas_Vallgren.pdf

This was posted previously in another disussion and is a useful starting point for anyone looking to find out some more info on Top-End storms.

 :)
Storm Chaser,
Thunderbolt Tours - USA & Australia Storm Chase Tours
www.thunderbolttours.com

Offline Mike

  • Australian Severe Weather Moderators
  • Wedge tornado F5
  • *
  • Posts: 1,348
  • Gender: Male
  • Dry season here...boring!
    • http://StormscapesDarwin.com
Re: Top End Storm Information - Master's Thesis
« Reply #1 on: 09 January 2007, 09:30:20 AM »
Certainly was interesting.  Not too sure about the calculations - they're a bit over my head I have to embarrassingly suggest!  Found it informative considering i live in that part of the country.  You can ask all the questions you like, but there's nothing like facts to figures to show you just how little one does know about tropical storms.  (a bit like silencing the critics you could say...!)
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14

Offline Jimmy Deguara

  • Australian and Tornado Alley storm chaser
  • Administrator
  • Wedge tornado F5
  • *
  • Posts: 2,218
  • Gender: Male
  • Storm Chaser since 1993, Tornado Alley 2001
    • Australia Severe Weather
Re: Top End Storm Information - Master's Thesis
« Reply #2 on: 09 January 2007, 02:52:17 PM »
Mike,

I had read the paper a few years ago and found it informative given the variety of thunderstorms, their origin and behaviour.

Given you have read the paper thoroughly, what types of storms are occurring currently during this current 'buildup'?

As to reference to 'critics', no requirement to even mention it on this forum. Enjoy the buildup given it provide an opportunity to finally photograph decent action in your area.

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
-------------------------------------
Australian Severe Weather
www.australiasevereweather.com

Australian Thunderbolt Tours
www.thunderbolttours.com

Phone  0408 020468  (International :  61  2  408 020468)

Offline Mike

  • Australian Severe Weather Moderators
  • Wedge tornado F5
  • *
  • Posts: 1,348
  • Gender: Male
  • Dry season here...boring!
    • http://StormscapesDarwin.com
Re: Top End Storm Information - Master's Thesis
« Reply #3 on: 10 January 2007, 05:34:40 AM »
Hey there Jimmy.

Perhaps 'critics' was the wrong word per se - but i'm referring to those folk who 'think' they know all but remain silent and generally speaking of those who like to 'think' they're as knowledgable as you - to which they're not!

Anyway, the monsoon is due tomorrow, although looking out of the office window now you'd think it was here.  We've had several large scale storms over the last few days. 

The storms we're getting now are not continental squall line or pulse severe/storms, as the previous day's storms have come from over land from the SE into Darwin.

 It's typically large monsoonal lines with the fronts spreading over about 10-30km wide (or more).  This morning driving around town on the coast the front was typically from the NW right around to the NE - covering a far greater zone,  I live 22 km from Darwin and the edge of the front was there and right around to Darwin harbour coming from the N/NW and NE.

 So you could say it's part of the monsoon shear or monsoonal squall line.  There is 'some' electrical activity from this at the moment as you'd expect, but these storms tend to 'hang' over Darwin a lot longer rather than push through and blow out.  Mid level wind values of >30 knots appear to be the norm with the monsoon trough nearby.  Possible severe storm types are from monsoon westerly squalls, but from what i can see and hear it's a fair bet that that is what we can expect from Wed onwards.

The monsoonal rain squalls come with such frequency that if there are storms embedded in the lines you can't take photos of them anyway - the skies overcast to the max with constant heavy showers coming every half hour reducing visibility to zip.

Hope that helps.  I can't give you any in-depth CAPE values or anything  (as much as i'd love to) but I'd look like an idiot if i attempted it!

I will get some technical info from the met office and pass them on to you and the forum.

Mike

« Last Edit: 10 January 2007, 06:36:15 AM by Jimmy Deguara »
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14