Author Topic: NSW / QLD / VIC / TAS Rain, Storms & Snow (incl Moama tornado): 9-12 August 2010  (Read 14466 times)

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Offline Colin Maitland

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Rain has continued to fall all day here in Brisbane. The heaviest of the falls in the SEQ was that on the Gold Coast with Coolangatta receiving 43 mm as at 6.27 pm.

The radar is showing heavy rain moving in this evening just as the weather forecast has predicted. Tomorrow we should be seeing some very high totals in some areas and with this comes the possibility of flash flooding.

So take care.

Col

Offline Colin Maitland

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We had some very heavy rain through out the night. Here at Bracken Ridge we received 92mm since 9.00am Tuesday morning.

WZ News States that QLD had record rains for August. Part of the article states:

Record August rain floods Queensland
Press Release, Wednesday August 11, 2010 - 09:03 EST

Many Queenslanders have been experiencing their heaviest August rain on record as widespread 50 to 100 millimetres leads to flooding, according to weatherzone.com.au.

Since early Tuesday widespread 50 to 100mm has affected a huge area of many thousands of kilometres, from the NSW border to Townsville and inland, past Emerald.

The Southeast Coast has been one of the wettest areas in the state. Brisbane has had its highest 24-hour August total in 123 years and its heaviest rain since February. Since 9am Tuesday about 78mm has fallen in the city, making this the wettest 24-hour period in August since 1887. In August that year 220mm fell in a two-day deluge including a record 124mm in a day.

In the last 24 hours the heaviest rain in the area has been south of the city, where Archerfield broke an August record, gaining 83mm. Its previous August record was 67mm, set in 1966.

Falls in excess of 100mm have been recorded in Burbank, Rochedale, Mt Cotton and Carbrook.



Col

Offline Richary

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« Last Edit: 12 August 2010, 04:58:13 AM by Michael Bath »

Offline Michael Bath

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Moama tornado which appear to have occurred just after 4pm 10 August 2010

THE MOAMA TORNADO


See : 128km Radar Loop for Yarrawonga, 03:00 10/08/2010 to 10:00 10/08/2010 UTC
Location: Mcleans Ridges, NSW Northern Rivers
Australian Severe Weather:   http://australiasevereweather.com/
Lightning Photography:   http://www.lightningphotography.com/
Early Warning Network: http://www.ewn.com.au
Contact: Michael Bath

Offline Mike

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Happy to see that these morons find it all too funny that someone's house may have been damaged - nice footage.  Commentary leaves much to be desired regrettably!
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14

Offline Colin Maitland

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As the rain band (trough) moves out to sea, the low will deepen and tomorrow we are faced with the onslaught of strong winds. With all the rain we have had it is only natural for the ground to soften which in turn could cause many problems. There is severe weather warning in place for much of the South East.

BOM have issued this Warning for the SEQ:


TOP PRIORITY FOR IMMEDIATE BROADCAST
SEVERE WEATHER WARNING
for Damaging wind gusts for Thursday
For people in the Wide Bay and Burnett district south of Maryborough to Proston,
the Darling Downs and Granite Belt east of Texas to Dalby and the South-east
Coast. 

Issued at 11:25 am on Wednesday 11 August 2010

Synoptic Situation:
A low near Victoria is expected to deepen overnight and produce a tight pressure
gradient across the south-east corner of the state during Thursday.

SW winds with gusts in excess of 90 kph will develop early Thursday especially
about the higher ground.
 

The next warning is due to be issued by 5 pm Wednesday AEST.



Col

Offline Michael Bath

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The widespread nature of the heavy falls in QLD was impressive. Must be one of the best "rain band" events for this time of years in a very long time.

Maps shows 24 hours fall to 9am 11 August.


Location: Mcleans Ridges, NSW Northern Rivers
Australian Severe Weather:   http://australiasevereweather.com/
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Contact: Michael Bath

Offline Michael Thomas

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« Last Edit: 14 August 2010, 06:03:37 PM by Jimmy Deguara »

Offline Harley Pearman

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Rainfall summary for 24 hours to 9 am 11/8/2010

Note:- All figures quoted here are from the various BOM Weather station network for 11/8/2010.

In addition to earlier posts, some of the heaviest rain occurred around Brisbane including 100 mm at Carindale, 103 mm at Mt Cotton and 109 mm at Burbank Alert. Rainfalls of between 50 to 100 mm were common right across Brisbane and its suburban areas.

The Richmond / Tweed area of far NE New South Wales received from 50 mm to 80 mm and Gold Coast region 50 mm to 60 mm of rain.

The best falls were around Bundaberg - 105 mm, Harvey Bay - 100 mm and the Mackay region (Anywhere from 77 mm to 112 mm).

Isolated heavy falls also occurred around inland North West New South Wales such as 50 mm at Mt Lindsay and 41 mm at Mt Kaputar.

Parts of Southern Victoria received some significant falls including Port Fairy 56 mm, Apollo Bay 60 mm, Mt Sabine 82 mm and Weeaproinah 92 mm. Melbourne received much lighter totals.
 
Looking at the various weather stations across Southern New South Wales and Northern Victoria, thunderstorms and showers brought mixed rainfalls. Many places received strong rainfalls such as Jingellic 30 mm, Khancoban 34 mm, Benalla 34 mm, Yarrawonga 32 mm, Wangaratta 35 mm, Wagga Wagga 30 mm, Tarcutta 35 mm, Tumbarumba 39 mm and Batlow 44 mm yet other places missed out or received light falls.

Albury Airport is one such place. An afternoon thunderstorm moved right over Albury then Wodonga from the north to south but missed the airport rain gauge and hence a final figure of 8.2 mm for the 24 hours to 9 am 11/8/10 has occurred. The airport figure may not be representative of what happened 2 or 3 km away. Further, the nearby Lake Hume Weather station had 12 mm for the same period. Griffith received 3.2 mm, Yanco 3 mm and Hay 2 mm. This shows the nature of the event that has just occurred. Some places did well while other places missed out. Hence many of the storms and showers were hit or miss across this region.


Harley Pearman

Offline Hardy25

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Was Watching Bom Radar When This All Happened And Shouted Out To The Wife And Told Her Something Interesting Was Happening Near The Border
Then Awoke This Morning To The News Of A Tornado
Interesting To See So Many Of These Winter Events This Year, But With The Rise Of YouTube And Changing Weather Patterns Its Not Surprising

I Had Wanted To Posted Some Information Earlier But Took Awhile For My Account To Be Activated And Then Someone Beat Me To It

Ill Post An Introduction Later

Hardy
« Last Edit: 14 August 2010, 05:48:31 PM by Jimmy Deguara »

Offline Antonio (stormboy)

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PS: Sandra Sully On Late News Just Said " mini cyclone" i wanna slap her for not knowing better and her cue writters for being stupid. how can you show a full picture of a tornado then say " mini cyclone" far out

Haha that made me laugh cause when the lennox waterspout happened it was a "mini cyclone" my goodness the news is dumb.

Also welcome to the forum.

Antonio

Offline Brad Hannon

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Hi all, a whole heap of my pics chasing southern NSW on 10th August are posted at the link below.
Im happy to post them here but it takes too long to upload them - Michael or Jimmy let me know if there is an easier way thanks.

I got a beautiful squall line and shelf amongst other storms in a rewarding chase a long way from home.  Thanks to Nick Moir and John Allen for their assistance with forcast, targetting and nowcasting.

http://www.theaustralianweatherforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=587&p=23487#p23487

« Last Edit: 13 August 2010, 05:55:06 PM by Brad Hannon »
hmmm June 2nd......

Offline Michael Thomas

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Nice photos there Brad, not bad for August! Is that a funnel under the base of a developing cumulus in one of the photos? The conditions were pretty good out that way, nice low LCL, nice low-level CAPE and steep lapse rates. Correct me if I am wrong but I think there was a boundary running E-W close to the NSW-Vic border. This boundary (I would call it a warm front) seperated a cooler more stable air mass in central/souther Vic from a warmer air mass in NSW. I suspect that an interaction of the storm with this boundary was quite important. Although, there were several storms occurring at the time and other storms had occurred earlier in the day so an interaction with an outflow boundary may of been involved. Just some ideas.

Offline Brad Hannon

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Hi Michael, thanks for your comments.  I do think you are right re a boundary and it was definitely warmer and more unstable in NSW earlier (more heating was evident) and then the instability moved into Vic later on.  Yes that was a funnel and that was the main reason for watching that cell as it was one of the smaller for the arvo!  I saw the punching updraft first in my rear vision and stopped to watch it when I noticed first the funnel develop and then ragged scud start to organise but it was moving south and I was waiting for the squall to come through from the NW so I let it go.  Regarding outflow boundaries, two very large storms had moved through the region earlier in the day including one just prior to the funnel and also a very large storm around 2pm (that I am informed displayed supercellular characteristics on radar) so I guess the outflow boundary theory is possible but as you said, the conditions were pretty good as it was with the LCL's, steep lapse rates, OK cape and some shear to boot.
hmmm June 2nd......

Offline Colin Maitland

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As Brisbane was battered with Strong Gusty winds, the Granite Belt region of Stanthorpe felt the Arctic blast with sleet falling throughout the region. Stanthorpe reached a maximum of 9C yesterday, all be it, probably only for a few minutes. Every time I checked the current conditions for the area, the thermometer seemed to only hover around the 5C mark. I am wondering if MB and Co. chased the snow/sleet around the table lands. According to BOM there is once again the chance of sleet this morning,(Friday) for the region.     

In Brisbane and surrounding areas, including as far North as Gympie, tree branches and trees brought down power lines resulting in about 6000 homes/business loosing power. I believe this was not as bad as it could have been for the fact that the strongest wind gust was 70Km/h at Archerfield, this falling short of the 90km/h plus winds that were first predicted. Damage was minimal according to reports from the SES.

Some boats on the Brisbane River lost their moorings and drifted around the river. A barge servicing the Tugun desalination plant was washed ashore with the strong winds and large seas.

Weather conditions should ease and improve by this afternoon.

Col.