Author Topic: Pulse or severe pulse storms  (Read 3480 times)

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Offline Mike

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Pulse or severe pulse storms
« on: 03 August 2007, 02:10:34 PM »
Is it possible that the aforementioned storms have a Rear Flank Downdraught or a Forward Flank Downdraught that has a positive impact on their development?  Is only supercells that have this feature which enhances them?   Would this feature only be with a mesoscale convective system with multiple cells within?

Mike
« Last Edit: 05 August 2007, 04:44:21 AM by Mike »
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14

Offline Mike

  • Australian Severe Weather Moderators
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Re: Pulse or severe pulse storms
« Reply #1 on: 04 August 2007, 03:35:44 AM »
Thanks John.  I've read so much on storms and taken in what they have to say, but was under the misconception that pulse storms - severe or not - would attract a Rear Flank Downdraught or Forward Flank Downdraught I asked about.  Sometimes when you are watching storms mature - especially on time-lapse - you often consider whether what you are seeing are those two characteristics, when in fact it's just inflow/outflow cloud and without any respectable shear it just wouldn't happen?

Even with bigger pulse storms I've seen I do now recall not seeing any RFD from what you have explained. 

Mike
« Last Edit: 05 August 2007, 04:43:16 AM by Mike »
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14

Offline Mike

  • Australian Severe Weather Moderators
  • Wedge tornado F5
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  • Posts: 1,348
  • Gender: Male
  • Dry season here...boring!
    • http://StormscapesDarwin.com
Re: Pulse or severe pulse storms
« Reply #2 on: 04 August 2007, 01:57:55 PM »
And this question please.

So cold pooling is actually to the rear of storms or to the front or both depending on what type of storm system it is?

So cold pooling can actually be to the rear of storms and act as an uplifting mechanism forcing the warmer air to circulate over the top o the cold pool area and frontward to the gust front area and then be push outward and upward in a circular fashion enabling the storm to ingest this warm drier air to maintain maturity and/or more progression?

If cold pooling is to the forward area of the gust front then the speed of the storm motion depicts whether it will kill itself off due to excess cold air being forced outward blocking the inflow of warm air ahead of it?

Mike.....:P
« Last Edit: 04 August 2007, 02:12:41 PM by Mike »
Darwin, Northern Territory.
StormscapesDarwin.com
Lightning Research 2010/14