Author Topic: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan  (Read 5478 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Jeff Brislane

  • Guest
Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« on: 08 November 2006, 02:34:21 PM »
just saw a news report of a killer tornado in Japan of all places but I have seen pretty violent tornadoes occur there before so I guess they are not new there, but I would say that the fatality rate of this tornado is certainly something new for them. I haven't found any images yet. Anyone else got any info?

Jeff.

Offline David C

  • Global Moderator
  • Barrel tornado F4
  • *
  • Posts: 643
  • Gender: Male
    • Thunderbolt Tours Storm Chasing Adventures
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #1 on: 09 November 2006, 06:36:51 AM »
I didnt take note of where the tornado was, however Japan (Tokyo), always feels very soupy (muggy) through spring, summer and perhaps into fall -  no shortage of fuel that's for sure. Would be interesting to look at some charts and see what the situation was.
Storm Chaser,
Thunderbolt Tours - USA & Australia Storm Chase Tours
www.thunderbolttours.com

Offline David C

  • Global Moderator
  • Barrel tornado F4
  • *
  • Posts: 643
  • Gender: Male
    • Thunderbolt Tours Storm Chasing Adventures
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #2 on: 09 November 2006, 06:41:34 AM »
AMS article - Tornadoes in Japan 
http://ams.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1175%2F1520-0442(1997)010%3C1730:ASSOTA%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Just took a quick look at GFS for yesterday early afternoon (just for example) - very impressive and deep trough with negative tilt upper trough .......low topped supercells perhaps. GFS 500 temperature chart -- 100+knot midlevel jetstreak and similarly impressive low level flow.   
« Last Edit: 09 November 2006, 07:01:39 AM by David Croan »
Storm Chaser,
Thunderbolt Tours - USA & Australia Storm Chase Tours
www.thunderbolttours.com

Offline Andrej Matko

  • Rope Tornado F0
  • *
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Male
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #3 on: 09 November 2006, 06:28:34 PM »
Here are two news links, third one is actual photo of the tornado, which appears to be shot relatively close to the circulation.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/asiapcf/11/07/japan.tornado.ap/index.html
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/6123426.stm
http://news.yahoo.com/photo/061107/ids_photos_wl/r2868142840.jpg

Offline Jimmy Deguara

  • Australian and Tornado Alley storm chaser
  • Administrator
  • Wedge tornado F5
  • *
  • Posts: 2,218
  • Gender: Male
  • Storm Chaser since 1993, Tornado Alley 2001
    • Australia Severe Weather
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #4 on: 09 November 2006, 11:49:29 PM »
Wow Marko,

That tornado is might close to the personal space of the photographer!

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
-------------------------------------
Australian Severe Weather
www.australiasevereweather.com

Australian Thunderbolt Tours
www.thunderbolttours.com

Phone  0408 020468  (International :  61  2  408 020468)

Jeff Brislane

  • Guest
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #5 on: 10 November 2006, 08:33:42 AM »
On the evidence given by damage, eyewitnesses and the only actual photo of the twister, how can it not be a tornado? And the wind estimates of 70 meters per second are very strong and make it at least an F2. Now if there is rotation in the updraft as you suggest than it's a supercell spawned tornado but if theres no rotation in the updraft but merely rotation caused by wind convergence at the surface than it's a landspout. But an F2 landspout would be very rare.

John i'd think you'd have to ask "Is a supercell that's caused by local factors such as convergence and boundarys still a supercell?" or in fact is a supercell in it's simplest terms any storm that develops a rotating updraft no matter what the meso scale enviromental conditions are like?


Jeff Brislane

  • Guest
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #6 on: 15 November 2006, 02:50:57 PM »
John, I did mention that the definition I gave of a supercell is in it's simplest terms. There are other factors that come into to play to decide whether a storm or not is in fact a supercell. Two other factors are of course the strength and duration of rotation as different people have different views on how these two factors relate to supercell definition.

And as you mentioned rotation within multi-cells, I would like to clarify that supercells embeded within multi-cells are in fact reasonably common. It would not be contentious at all to declare a supercell present within a multi-cell system and in the USA during the early season it's very common and they are no less supercells for being embeded.

Let me also say that short lived rotation in cells will very rarely create tornadoes. You need strong low level shear present to create even weaker tornadoes. If there is enough shear to create a weak tornadoe in a multi-cell updraft than the updraft would have to have strong enough rotation to declare it to be an embedded supercell. Landspouts though are a different story as they are not primarily meso-cyclone produced.




Jeff Brislane

  • Guest
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #7 on: 15 November 2006, 03:49:32 PM »
John, are you testing me? When did I ever mention the word "isolated" in regard to embedded supercells? Isolated supercells occur just like that, isolated from other cells or meso-scale systems. I'm talking about embedded supercells which occur within meso-scale systems.
Posted on: November 14, 2006, 07:38:41 PM
I think that maybe this topic has gone a little too far off course. Of relavance was the fact that a tornado of F2 intesity struck a small town in japan. This was more than likely a tornadic event given the desciptions by eyewitnesses and the level of destruction as well "cars lifted, power poles snapped, buildings collapsed, etc as opposed to a landspout event. Probable cause was a mini supercell (low topped supercell) in the system that produced the event. It would be similar to the tornado event from WA this august gone.

Paul Graham

  • Guest
Re: Tornado Kills 9 in Japan
« Reply #8 on: 15 November 2006, 04:05:25 PM »
Hi Everyone - Interesting discussion.  From what I understand of this event, it would seem to me that it was probably the result of a cold-air supercell, similar to the type that occur in southwest WA during the winter.  There was probably a bit more convective energy involved and the event turned out to be in the high-end of the intensity spectrum as far as cold-air events go.