Author Topic: NE NSW storms and Waterspout May 24 2011  (Read 6404 times)

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Offline enak_12

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NE NSW storms and Waterspout May 24 2011
« on: 25 May 2011, 03:50:57 PM »
I seem to have a bit of luck during may over the last few years. Today I went down to the coast to wait for the sunset and shoot some weak storms. I was lucky enough to be there at the right time to see this waterspout, I only wish I had a lens longer then 50mm..





and not long later I finally got some lightning!



pretty cool little outing :)

Offline Michael Bath

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Re: NE NSW storms and Waterspout May 24 2011
« Reply #1 on: 26 May 2011, 02:03:43 AM »
I was watching the radar yesterday afternoon and thought "Kane is going to get another show" and sure enough !! Well done getting out there and observing the waterspout and lightning.

The Coffs Coast does appear to be a hotspot for offshore cbs due to the topography and incidence of colder upper air reaching that latitude, more so than further north.

MB
Location: Mcleans Ridges, NSW Northern Rivers
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Offline enak_12

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Re: NE NSW storms and Waterspout May 24 2011
« Reply #2 on: 26 May 2011, 05:55:13 AM »
Haha It's true Michael I never miss a local event unless I'm working pretty much. Interesting about your obvservations regarding the frequency of offshore storms. They seem fairly common during the autumn months in particular. I think this is because we seem to be in a transitional zone as you say. We have a good combination of warm sea temps in the autumn months and get just enough of the cold air pushing up from the south importantly also as you say is the topography, we're lucky to have quite high mountains right down to the coast, I think this is important as we don't need much instability at all to kick off convection and combine that all together and we have a pretty good mix for these types of events.